Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Emma Crees featured in Disability Now

Our WONDERFUL blog contributor/writer Emma Crees has had an article featured in the Disability Now magazine and website. We are very excited for her wonderful work as a writer and feel glad that people are beginning to realise her great talents in the public world.

Hopefully we will be able to share many more of her inspirational words with you all! Please visit her lovely article titled 'People Say The Strangest Things'.

Wheelchair forest

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Diana Palmer Speaking at the Access Tourism NZ conference

Our wonderful Managing Director, Diana Palmer, spoke at the recent Access Tourism NZ Conference on the 4th of October 2010. As our organisation is branching out into the Accessible Tourism Industry this was a very interesting Conference for us to take part in.

We pride ourselves on our ability to find the information needed for people to have accessible holidays, in terms of accommodation, travel, equipment, resources and services, etc. Please check out the video of the speakers below. Well done to Diana for your great work!

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

My First Week with the iPhone

One of the other staff at the organisation I work for, IDEAS NSW, prompted me to read this posting from a very nice guy called Austin Seraphin. Austin writes about his experience having an iPhone for the first week. But heres the catch, Austin is vision impaired. I have to commend him for the way he has spoken and created the 'images' (yes that's right images) that this phone has given him. I am sure that an occassion such as this would be one of the most memorable experiences that one could go through. I have taken a little extract from the blog posting that he has done on his blog Behind the Curtain. I suggest that you follow the link and check out the rest of the post, truly is amazing.

My First Week with the iPhone, by Austin Seraphin

Last Wednesday, my life changed forever. I got an iPhone. I consider it the greatest thing to happen to the blind for a very long time, possibly ever. It offers unparalleled access to properly made applications, and changed my life in twenty-four hours. The iPhone only has one thing holding it back: iTunes. Nevertheless, I have fallen in love.

When I first heard that Apple would release a touchpad cell phone with VoiceOver, the screen reading software used by Macs, I scoffed. The blind have gotten so used to lofty promises of a dream platform, only to receive some slapped together set of software with a minimally functional screen reader running on overpriced hardware which can’t take a beating. I figured that Apple just wanted to get some good PR – after all, how could a blind person even use a touchpad? I laughed at the trendies, both sighted and blind, buying iPhones and enthusing about them. That changed when another blind friend with similar opinions also founded in long years of experience bought one, and just went nuts about how much she loved it, especially the touchpad interface. I could hardly believe it, and figured that I should reevaluate things.

I have seen a lot of technology for the blind, and I can safely say that the iPhone represents the most revolutionary thing to happen to the blind for at least the last ten years. Fifteen or twenty years brings us back to the Braille ‘n Speak, which I loved in the same way, so have a hard time choosing the greater. In my more excitable moments, I consider the iPhone as the greatest thing to have ever happened to the blind, and it may prove so. Time will tell. The touchpad offers the familiar next/previous motion which the blind need, since speech offers one-dimensional output. Adding the ability to touch anywhere on the screen and hear it adds a whole other dimension, literally. For the first time, the blind can actually get spacial information about something. In the store, Mom could say “Try that button” and I could. Blind people know what I mean. How many times has a sighted person said “I see an icon at the top of the screen?” Now, that actually Means something. I want to find a way to browse the web with a touchpad on my computer. It truly represents the wave of the future.


The other night, however, a very amazing thing happened. I downloaded an app called Color Identifier. It uses the iPhone’s camera, and speaks names of colors. It must use a table, because each color has an identifier made up of 6 hexadecimal digits. This puts the total at 16777216 colors, and I believe it. Some of them have very surreal names, such as Atomic Orange, Cosmic, Hippie Green, Opium, and Black-White. These names in combination with what feels like a rise in serotonin levels makes for a very psychedelic experience.

I have never experienced this before in my life. I can see some light and color, but just in blurs, and objects don’t really have a color, just light sources. When I first tried it at three o’clock in the morning, I couldn’t figure out why it just reported black. After realizing that the screen curtain also disables the camera, I turned it off, but it still have very dark colors. Then I remembered that you actually need light to see, and it probably couldn’t see much at night. I thought about light sources, and my interview I did for Get Lamp. First, I saw one of my beautiful salt lamps in its various shades of orange, another with its pink and rose colors, and the third kind in glowing pink and red.. I felt stunned.

The next day, I went outside. I looked at the sky. I heard colors such as “Horizon,” “Outer Space,” and many shades of blue and gray. I used color cues to find my pumpkin plants, by looking for the green among the brown and stone. I spent ten minutes looking at my pumpkin plants, with their leaves of green and lemon-ginger. I then roamed my yard, and saw a blue flower. I then found the brown shed, and returned to the gray house. My mind felt blown. I watched the sun set, listening to the colors change as the sky darkened. The next night, I had a conversation with Mom about how the sky looked bluer tonight. Since I can see some light and color, I think hearing the color names can help nudge my perception, and enhance my visual experience. Amazing!

I love my iPhone. It changed my universe as soon as it entered it. However, as any Discordian knows, every golden Apple has a golden worm at its center.